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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
making the case, get out from behind closed doors and negotiate the terms of the fiscal cliff deal in public. let's listen. >> i get nervous when two people disappear into a white house room and start making a grand alliance and they think, we're going to do this and get it out of the secret meetings and into the public venues to the american people and the congress themselves, we're responsible for making intelligent decisions. that should be done publicly. but at some point, after public debate and so forth, yes, private negotiations can help bridge the gap and bring us to a successful conclusion. >> mary, what do you think? will that be a kiss of death? >> i don't think there's time, wolf, the president has been dragging its feet. we have a few numbers of days left before we go off the fiscal cliff and taxes are raised for everybody. so speaker boehner knows a caucus, a serious, mature sober leader. he knows what his principles are. he's a principled conservative, a mainstream businessman and knows what the issues are. the house should and is largely trusting him. >> and what do
of this fiscal cliff deal. that includes house democrats. and how do i go about doing that without totally alienating the base of my party? and i'm very curious to see what his next step is because his opening offer was essentially where he said he could only go in the debt ceiling bargains of july 2011. he said i can go to $800 billion in revenue, i can do these specific entitlement reforms. that's now his opening offer. where does he go here? >> i think, though, steve that the president of the united states and mr. lew and other democrats need to start looking at him differently. he is like an attorney that knows what his client is going to give and what his client's not going to give. we all know john boehner. john boehner's a deal maker. i didn't -- i liked him personally, but i never trusted him in congress because, you know, he liked making deals. that's what we need right now. the president can only push him so far. or he loses his caucus. and this is not about john boehner kicking and screaming. this is about him knowing what he can deliver. >> i understand that. john boehner has,
to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal on the cliff before the first of the year, and if this goes south, a 53% of the american people are prepared to blame republicans. the president's job approval rating is well over 50%. congress' approval rating is under 20%. why what a the president back down? >> the president isn't interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding a fiscal cliff, and clearly not been tested at all in cutting and spending. >> the senate minority leader says that what the president is interested in is getting as much taxpayer money has he can so that he can spend to his heart's content. with his approval ratings going up and congress' numbers at historic lows and the unemployment rate dropping, why with the president back down? charles? >> to some extent he is under estimating the damage she will suffer if -- he suffer if we go over the cliff. it will hurt the republicans in congress, which is why democrats will relish going over the cliff. but oba
on averting the fiscal cliff. negotiations are pretty much at a standstill, but if you ask house speaker john boehner, he has an idea of who's holding things up. >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. but none of it's going to be impossible. the president insists on his position. insists on my way or the highway. >> in his weekly white house address this morning, president obama responded to boehner's remark. >> i'm willing to make more entitlement spending cuts on top of the one trillion dollars in spending cuts i signed into law last year. but if we're serious about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >>> holiday hiring may have given a big boost to the jobs report released yesterday. retail hirers hired more people than any month on record since 1939. 146
to 7.7%. we might want to keep inind as we head f the fiscal cliff. according to recent pololl, only 4 in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal before the first of the year, and ondthis does goes out,t, 5 53% of the american people are apparely prepared to blame republicans t president's job approval rating is over 50% congress' is under 20%. why y would the president back down? >> it is safe to say that the prident is n interested in a balanced agreement, he is not particularly intererted in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and he is not interested at all in cutting spending. >> the senate minority leader adds that what the president is interested in is getting as s much taayer money a as he can said that he can spend to his heart's contntent. wiwith hispproval ratings going up and congress' at historic lows, why would t president back down, charles? >> to some extent he is underestimating the dama he woduffer if we e go over the cliff. for suret will hurt republicans in congress, and that is why democrats in congressss are relishing going over theliff. but obama
a fiscal cliff agreement. [ ♪ "world news tonight" ♪ ] the numbers are largely unchanged from the ones conducted right after the election. that's exactly what the president said. we're in the exit polls. to only 27% would blame obama if the country goes over the cliff. blah blah, blah. to that 64%ers who didn't believe it would have a major effect on the u.s. economy and 60% think that will be negative. who are republicans fighting for? not for a majority of americans. he's fighting for the top 2% who he says are actually small business owners. >> mmm no. >> stephanie: talk points are getting moldy. a $600 million a year hedge fund would qualify as a small business by paul ryan's misleading definition. regardless of the small business description, that still puts them in the 1% which is less than the majority of americans are compressed by the jobs. >> small compared to the planet jupiter. >> stephanie: right. all relative. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: i don't know what this means. [ ♪ "world news tonight"
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)